Trends in interracial dating

There was one black family in town; they had only one child around my age, so he was the only black kid in my school.We didn't think of him as "black" or "half-black" or "mulatto," though. That experience has largely defined race relations for me.Americans on whether they believed it was acceptable for Blacks and Whites to date each other.At that time, less than 50% of Americans thought interracial dating was acceptable. Our examination of the data suggests that the increasing rate of intermarriage may be driven by demographic changes more than changing attitudes.Today, there are proportionately more Asians, Hispanics and people of other racial/ethnic backgrounds in the United States than ever.These racial/ethnic groups have always been unusually likely to intermarry.

Also, African men – especially those who are socially mobile – are the most likely to marry outside their group, while African women are the least likely to do so.Not so, of course, for much of our nation's history and many of our nation's people. One finding is that a more general population shift to the southern states now includes an increased number of African Americans who, for the past century, have lived in higher concentrations in the Northeast.But interesting new trends are emerging from the 2010 U. Perhaps related to this trend are reports that in the Deep South, inter-racial marriages are gaining wider acceptance. Some moons ago, my first official "date" was with a black boy.(I am white, by the way.) Technically he was half-black, but in the remote Maine community where I grew up, it didn't make much difference either way.

Trends in interracial dating